Guide to Companies act – 2013 Second Edition (2016)

Guide to Companies act – 2013 Second Edition (2016)

Guide to Companies act – 2013 Second Edition (2016)

The 1956 Act has been in need of a substantial revamp for quite some time now, to make it more contemporary and relevant to corporate, regulators and other stakeholders in India. While several unsuccessful attempts have been made in the past to revise the existing 1956 Act, there have been quite a few changes in the administrative portion of the 1956 Act. The most recent attempt to revise the 1956 Act was the Companies Bill, 2009 which was introduced in the Lok -Sabha, one of the two Houses of Parliament of India, on 3 August 2009. This Companies Bill, 2009 was referred to the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Finance, which submitted its report on 31 August 2010 and was withdrawn after the introduction of the Companies Bill, 2011. The Companies Bill, 2011 was also considered by the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Finance which submitted its report on 26 June 2012. Subsequently, the Bill was considered and approved by the Lok Sabah on 18 December 2012 as the Companies Bill, 2012 (the Bill). The Bill was then considered and approved by the Rajya Sabha too on 8 August 2013. It received the President’s assent on 29 August 2013 and has now become the Companies Act, 2013.

One-person company:

The 2013 Act introduces a new type of entity to the existing list i.e. apart from forming a public or private limited company, the 2013 Act enables the formation of a new entity a ‘one-person company’ (OPC). An OPC means a company with only one person as its member

 Private company

The 2013 Act introduces a change in the definition for a private company, inter-alia, the new requirement increases the limit of the number of members from 50 to 200.

Small company

A small company has been defined as a company, other than a public company.

Dormant company

 The 2013 Act states that a company can be classified as dormant when it is formed and registered under this 2013 Act for a future project or to hold an asset or intellectual property and has no significant accounting transaction. Such a company or an inactive one may apply to the ROC in such manner as may be prescribed for obtaining the status of a dormant company.

 
Share Us On Your Networks